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20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
my generation. from that decided to go make a film about the election in 2008 and went around the country interviewing members of congress about why they thought people weren't voting in trying to get them to vote and start an organization called generation 19 which took us around the country and registered new voters in 2000 then we did a similar film in 2012 as well is doing all that i went to in my youth where i graduated. >> host: we both were part of the same program then? >> guest: we both went there and it was a great program and a highly recommended. >> host: it allowed you to craft your own curriculum and you can cross-disciplines and that is the point. what did you do? >> guest: my concentration was the intersection of film technology -- technology with an emphasis on social change. >> host: your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest boomers i know. let's talk about that generation for a minute because they get some flack for some mistakes that they made and have made. >> guest: i think the boomer generation was an incredibly and is an in
a film about the election in 2008, and went around the country interviewing members of congress about why they thought more young people weren't voting, and trying to get my peers to vote, which led into starting an organization called generation 18, which registered 25,000 new voters in 2008, and then we did a similar film in 2012, and while doing all that i went to nyu, where i graduated. >> host: i understand we both were part of the same program there? >> guest: yes. we both went to gal latin. >> it allows you to craft your own discipline and you can cross-discipline. >> guest: my concentration was the intersection of film, technology and politics, with an emphasis on youth and social change. >> host: so your dedication page read in part, to my mother and father, the greatest boomers i know. let talk about their generation for a minute. the different mistakes they may have made. what's you're overall read on baby-boomers. >> guest: the boomer generation is an incredibly important generation in our nation's history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possib
. from that they decided should go make a film about the election in 2008 and interviewing members of congress to get my peers to vote which led to starting an organization which took around the film registered voters in 2008 and a similar film and while doing all that i went to nyu where i graduated. >> i understand we were part of the same program. >> guest: yes i highly recommend it. >> host: it allows you to craft your own curriculum and you can cross disciplines. so what did you do? >> guest: my concentration with the intersection of film technology and politics was an emphasis on social change. >> host: so it sounds like your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest that i know. let's talk about the generation for a minute because they get some flax for mistakes they have made. what is your read on baby boomers. it is and was an incredibly generation in the history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing it forward and ending the war in
netanyahu has just been re-elected. so there were a series of miscalculations. but i think that what i would like to remind people of is that there is a tendency in the arab world, and possibly around the world to always say, america is just wrong it's america's fault. america didn't deliver. i think to some extent there is absolutely truth to that. but i think that it's also important for people in the region, for people like me, for people in the arab world, to come to grips with their own responsibility about what they can do. obviously it's very difficult for the palestinians to feel like they have the upper hand because they're certainly in a very difficult position, and they're not the strongest party at the negotiating tableful but it doesn't help the issues to just blame everything on the united states, and that is something that is ingrained a lot of people's thinking. >> host: what fascinated me, it's just a jumping off point, this private disagreement between the president and hillary clinton on how to approach the conflict. to ask you, were there lots of disagreements you could t
on the global stage. president obama knew when he was elected that he wasn't going to be able to travel around the world and make america's case on a daily basis because he was going to be busy at home with the economy. so there was a very clear reason why he -- one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state, because he knew she could do that for him on a daily basis in all around the world. and that's why i think that she would bring to him an accurate reading of where things stood, what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward, in terms of agreement, in terms of where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him, you know, what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles, but she certainly influenced a lot of decisions. libya being one of them and asia, definitely. >> host: uh-huh, and we'll get to libya next, actually, i find that a -- it was a or very interesting scenario in what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli/palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 when hillary clinton spoke at the
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)